Stephanie (blondeleo) wrote in glendonites,
Stephanie
blondeleo
glendonites

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Your answers needed

Me again. I'm kind of swinging more towards Glendon than Mac, but I'd like a few more questions answered. Thanks for your patience! I'm so happy to have found somewhere to interact with real students, it helps alot!

1. Do you find the fact that you have to take French restricting or annoying? Although I'm in the middle of gr12 French, I wasn't planning on taking it in uni until now. I plan to major in English/History and I don't want to risk a lower average because of French class. I like French, but am not that great at it. I'm pretty much wholly considering it in order to become more marketable post-grad.
2. Even though I've taken French through high school, could I still take a lower level French class in uni?
3. What were some of the best English and History courses you took first-year?
4. Were the Philosophy, Psychology, Linguistics, German, Canadian Studies ones great and/or interesting?
5. I have a friend who will attend Keele. If I want to visit her, is it a nuisance to get to the main campus?
6. Also, what percentage of classes are on the main campus?
7. If anyone's doing a concurrent teaching degree, do you have to do your practicums/blocks in the Toronto area?
8. Would it be difficult for me to do a double major and a concurrent teaching degree? Would there be a lot of choice in courses?
9. Which is a better residence - Wood or Hilliard? I'm thinking the former, but you tell me!
10. How quickly does the food at Glendon get boring? Do you often venture up to Keele to eat?
11. If anyone lives in the Oakville/Burlington/Hamilton area, do you find it difficult or time-consuming to visit home on weekends?
12. How easy is it to get a job at Glendon? I need to make money!

Even if you can only answer a few of these, thanks for the effort!
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  • 21 comments
I don't think I can answer all of them, but I'll try.

1) It was annoying at first. I was like you and didn't really plan on taking anymore french. But it's not that bad.
2) You could, but really the classes aren't much more difficult then high school. They do a little french mini-exam-questionaire thing when you're choosing your classes so you know what level to go in, and you might get the chance to do it accelerated, that is you do one full french course in each term, but more quickly. If you do it that way, you can get the french requirement done and out of the way by the end of second year.
5) To get to the main campus, you just hop on the shuttle and you're there in (usually) about half an hour. It's not that difficult, really. And it's free.
6) Your classes will only be on the main campus if you choose to take them at the main campus. There's different courses offered at both, so it really depends on what you choose. You can do the full four years without ever taking a single class at Keele, if you want to.
8) I don't know if that's possible, as I know they won't let you do a double major and a minor. But I'm not 100% on that.
9) This question will be biased. I live in Hilliard. I can't stand Wood. Therefore I'd say Hilliard. But it's a personal preferance. The way Wood is organized (a House goes up all floors, whereas in Hilliard one floor is a House) doesn't appeal to me. In Hilliard you get to know the people in your House, because they're all in the same place (if you like that kind of thing).
10) Uhm... a week? Haha. But really, ... no, I'd be lying if I said it wasn't that bad. It is. You die. Inside. But it's easy to go to Keele for food if you have the time. And there's a Dominion down the street.
11) I know lots of people that go home on weekends. Some of them like the drive, some of them hate it. I guess it depends on how you feel about it.
12) I think it's fairly easy, if you apply early enough.

Mmmmhm.
Is it true though, that in Wood you share a bathroom with less people?
Thanks for your help! Any info I can get is useful.

luck_fortune

11 years ago

Some questions I can answer...or i can try to answer. I am a transfer student from Guelph university and this was my first year atteneding glendon, so I have the advantage of at least being able to compare it to another large university...haha but anyway..

1) Generally if you going to go to glendon you should probably want to take the french, because you have to take 3 years of it (18 credits worth) as a minimum requirement. It's not really to restrictive though because you will have to take elective courses that are not just in your major anyway.
2)You take a test and they will place you in a class depending on your ability.
4)Psychology is good, I like it and I like the professors. One disadvantage that glendon has though is limitited selection for classes, where as keele and larger universities generally have a lot more option (but thats what happens when you go to a small campus, you can take clases at keele as well).
5)They have a bus that goes directly to keele and back straight from campus, I don't know how long it takes or how often it comes though, but I heared its much faster than taking public transit.
6)I'm pretty sure the rule is you have to take at least half of your classes on the glendon campus, and half of the classes in your major/minor have to be from glendon as well.
10)I don't even live on campus, and I am so fed up in the food on campus. Maybe I was spoiled at guelph where they had tons and tons of options, but really they only have a mr. sub and a cafeteria where half the time the food isn't being served. The food is always the same as well. So yes you will be bored. I am not sure how it works though in terms of being able to cook your own food because I don't live in residence.

Hope some of that info helped!
yeah, i'm pretty worried about the food aspect. Thanks for your help!

dazytripper

11 years ago

madam_vi

11 years ago

just to preface—i'm a first year student at glendon, and will likely be transfering to a different school next year... so i may have some harsh opinions. take this into account

1. to be honest, i found the mandatory french classes entirely too restricting. granted, i hadn't taken a french course since grade 10, and was consequently put into a low level course, which essentially meant i would have to take a course per year until i graduated to be eligible for the bilingual requirement. this was one of my key motivations in choosing to leave glendon. if you're very much interested in french, then this won't be a problem for you. but for me, it meant having to narrow down my (already limited) choices that much more.

2. someone has probably answered this for you, but when you come in for your course selection meeting, you will be asked to write a french language aptitude test. your high school french courses won't decide what level french you are put into, but your achievement on this test will. don't panic, your results won't stay with you or show up anywhere important if you don't do as badly as you'd like—they're just used to determine which class/level you'd be best suited for. also, if you find that you've been placed in a class that's progressing too fast/slowly after a few classes, you can always transfer to another level.

3.i'm an english major. this year i took eng 1520 (introduction to genres and approaches) with prof. davidson and eng 2608 (introduction to english grammar). and i've enjoyed both. i've been told that davidson's class is a bit heavier on the reading than other classes, but i've enjoyed it. the grammar class is interesting if you're into that sort of thing, but definitely not for everyone. it is a requirement to major in english, i believe. my history class (hist/huma/sosc 2905) was fantastic. reading and lecture intensive, but the prof (gayle comeau) was great.

4. i took intro to philosophy I and II (phil 1410 and phil 1420) in the fall and winter terms, respectively, with beryl logan and really dug it. she's a really neat prof.

5. free shuttle from glendon to keele and keele to glendon. the schedule is on the internet (you can find it by googling "glendon shuttle", i think). takes approximately 45 minutes, i think? i'm not sure.

6. you can choose to have no courses at keele campus, if you want. i had all my classes at glendon this year and was perfectly content. it saves a commute. if you choose to take courses at keele, the option is compeltely available to you, just make sure that you plan it well. you'll be hearing a lot more about this if you come in for your course selection meeting. oh, and a side note, make sure that if you're planning or double major or minor in something that it's offered at glendon. i wanted to minor in classical studies but wasn't able to do so because it wasn't offered at my home (glendon) campus.

9. wood is much smaller than hilliard, and you're required to look after far fewer keys. from what i've heard, wood also has larger rooms. it's further away from the main building, which can be an inconvenience, but right beside the library. i don't think that either residence is better than the other, it just depends on which one you decide to be in. i had no problem living in wood.

10. i only really, really, REALLY starting detesting the food in second semester. there's very little variety and eventually you'll start to get sick looking at the same foods, day in, day out. it's very difficult to be vegan at glendon, but there's enough vegetarian options.
wow, that was pretty informative. thanks!
I'm a Glendon-lover alum (how i miss student life!), so take my words with a grain of salt. Glendon was a perfect for me - but it isn't for everyone!

1. Do you find the fact that you have to take French restricting or annoying? Although I'm in the middle of gr12 French, I wasn't planning on taking it in uni until now. I plan to major in English/History and I don't want to risk a lower average because of French class. I like French, but am not that great at it. I'm pretty much wholly considering it in order to become more marketable post-grad.

I'm a translation grad so French wasn't an issue for me, but it definitely is for some people. If you're confident in your French & you do well in your placement, you can always just take a History class taught in French if you want. After grad, every bilingual agency and their dog was ringing me up - but I was mostly looking for translation work which they didn't usually have - great if you want to do customer service or work in an office though.

2. Even though I've taken French through high school, could I still take a lower level French class in uni?

Somebody said something about being able to switch if the level isn't quite right for you - i totally agree with that. you really don't want to pay $1000 for a "bird" course (which i'm sure isn't your intention anyway).

3. What were some of the best English and History courses you took first-year?

I only took EN 1520 in first year - with Professor Mandel. I liked it.

4. Were the Philosophy, Psychology, Linguistics, German, Canadian Studies ones great and/or interesting?

N/A

5. I have a friend who will attend Keele. If I want to visit her, is it a nuisance to get to the main campus?

Shuttle - like everyone else said (shuttle is +/- 35-45 mins, TTC is more liek 90 mins).

6. Also, what percentage of classes are on the main campus?

Someone else already answered that - the "half" rule.

7. If anyone's doing a concurrent teaching degree, do you have to do your practicums/blocks in the Toronto area?

While they've changed the program since I & some of my friends graduated, usually practicums take place DURING the week while you're in class - with a block at the end in the same school as you were in during th eyear. someone in the prog now can tell you better.

8. Would it be difficult for me to do a double major and a concurrent teaching degree? Would there be a lot of choice in courses?

You'd be much more down to your majors, ed coruses, and other requirements (French, general education). it's doable. but plan it out.


9. Which is a better residence - Wood or Hilliard? I'm thinking the former, but you tell me!

It's wherever you live first. :) (Hilliard all the way!!)

10. How quickly does the food at Glendon get boring? Do you often venture up to Keele to eat?

The food is bad. It made me sick the first week in rez. The Bistro is better though. I miss the "corner store" they used to have (l'arcade) where you could waste all your leftover money from avoiding caf food on over priced chocolate bars...

11. If anyone lives in the Oakville/Burlington/Hamilton area, do you find it difficult or time-consuming to visit home on weekends?

N/A

12. How easy is it to get a job at Glendon? I need to make money!

Be warned that jobs for first years get snapped up quickly as most hiring is done before the fall. Get your CV in ASAP. The library, security, liaison, proctor (the gym) are all good palces to look.
helpful, thanks!
I've lived in both Wood and Hilliard. Hilliard is newer and I find it to be a tad cleaner. The only problem I had in Wood last year was ants, but I was in the basement so it was expected. This year in Hilliard, I find that the people on my floor are a lot dirtier ie don't flush the toilets, leave their long hair all over the shower walls, etc. I guess it really all depends on the type of people you're forced to live next too as well as how willing your Don is to be involved.

As for the job on campus, I work for student security. It's an amazing job, great money and great hours for a night owl like myself.

Just keep in mind the University is based on what you make of it. If you come into it with an open mind, you'll be fairly content.
ick. but thanks for the info!
1. French is actually my major, so I don't find it restricting or annoying. Though I did actually find it annoying at the beginning of my university years. It's gotten better though and that's why I've chosen it as my major.

2. The level of French you are placed into depends on how you do on your placement test. You could've taken French for a long time and still be placed at a lower level.

3. Not sure about this.

4. Psychology is interesting, but make sure you take it with the right professors. There is one especially that is really dry and does nothing but read of the slides and it is basically a waste of time to go to class when you can just read and access the Powerpoint slides at home.

5. There is a intercampus shuttle bus that you can take from Glendon to Keele.

6. This all depends on which courses you want and Glendon doesn't offer them.

7. Not sure. I am looking into this myself.

8. See number 7.

9. I heard Wood is better because the res rooms are bigger, but Hilliard is newer. I have never lived in residence and never hope to.

10. There is not much food choice at Glendon. There is Mr. Sub and the caf. I'd say the food gets old pretty quick. I'm pretty sure the caf serves leftovers.

11. I actually live in the Oakville/Burlington area, and I actually commute. The commute is long, but it's actually cheaper than living in residence. I like the commute though living in residence has its benefits. You're from that area, I take it? What are the odds that there's somebody else from around the area?

12. Not sure, I work off-campus in the Oakville/Burlington area.

Hope this helps! =D
thanks for answering! as for #11, all I can say is that I know I'm the only student from my high school going to Glendon.
as a first year student, i'll try and answer your question as best i can! ;)

1. Honestly, I've really enjoyed getting my French back. I stopped taking it in Grade 10, but the idea of taking it again really excited me. Most of the french profs are GREAT and it's not really that hard to get a relatively good mark in the classes. Plus, you're right, it looks AWESOME on a resume, even if you're not bilingual, at least you can say you speak conversational french
2. I think this was answered before, but it's all based on the placement test that you have before you choose classes. There's 3 basic levels if you have high school french. There's 400 (which is basically you know nothing, beginner level french), 1500 (where most of my friends who took french until grade 12 were placed, as well as me who only took french until grade 10) and then 1510.
3. Fellow English major here. You have to take English 1520 as a first year course. It's a requirement. I had the most terrible prof ever, but I still enjoyed the class for the readings. If you end up going to Glendon, make sure you steer clear of Dr. Danielle Russell. She's a terrible lecturer. I'm taking English Grammar (also a requirement) and English 2510 next year. I've also heard great things about the Children's Lit course, which I plan to take eventually.
As for History, I don't know much about it except for the fact that I strongly advise you NOT to take Roots of World Civilization. If you expect a good lecturer, you won't get one. If you except to be interested, you won't be. You basically read the text book and then have multiple choice tests on it. No essays or anything. It's reasonably easy, but a terribly boring, hellish course.
4. All my friends who take Philosophy and Psych LOVE it. I plan on taking psych next year as an elective. The other course that I strongly reccomend if you have any interest is the Intro to Women's Studies. It's a GREAT course.
5. Also answered previously, but it's an easy trip. Free shuttle bus, it take like half an house.
6. You can take classes on main campus if you want, you can take ALL your classes at Glendon and never set foot on main campus if you so choose. It's up to you.
7. Sorry, no idea!
8. Hmm, again sorry, no idea
9. WOOD! WOOD WOOD!! Sorry, I'm a huge fan of Wood. I love the people I've met there. Wood has great parties. There's always people out and about it Wood. Basically, it rocks. I'll be there next year!
10. Mmmm.. FAST. I ordered a lot of Chinese this year. You just have to know what's good and what's not. I basically lived off grilled cheeses and chocolate soy milk this year. Try and go to the bistro as much as you can too. The food there is great! :D
11. I live in Orangeville, which is about an hour away from Toronto and I go home pretty much every weekend. I don't find the drive bad at all.
12. It's not too hard. ;) Everyone I know who wanted a job this year, got one. I think I'm going to work at the bistro next year.
you guys are all making this place sound better and better. thanks!

bunnygoeshop

11 years ago

Anonymous

April 3 2006, 02:19:55 UTC 11 years ago

1. If you're looking at French to be marketable post-grad, think about what you plan on doing post-grad, and what kind of level of French you think you can achieve. Speaking as a grad myself, I found that Glendon's minimum French requirement is an asset if you're working in a job that doesn't have its own specialized vocabulary. It's highly valued if you're doing customer service, call centre, tech support work etc. But if you're working a job that requires more specialized knowledge, your French will need to be better. Basically, for your French to be an asset in the workplace, your French needs to be able to do whatever your English can do in your job. Glendon will give you the skills to see where you'd need to improve your specialized French and go about doing so, but it's not reasonable to expect to take just the minimum French requirement and then, say, practise law bilingually.

11. Some people do this commute every day, so it's certainly not difficult for just weekends. It's an hour to an hour and a half in each direction, and if you don't have a car, the GO has a bus to Hamilton from Union every half hour, and a train along the Lakeshore line every hour.
I don't actually plan on using French that much in my job (as an eventual teacher), I just need it to get that job. So I'm thinking that if I go to York, I'll end up in the mid-level French class.
Thanks for the info!
1. Do you find the fact that you have to take French restricting or annoying? Although I'm in the middle of gr12 French, I wasn't planning on taking it in uni until now. I plan to major in English/History and I don't want to risk a lower average because of French class. I like French, but am not that great at it. I'm pretty much wholly considering it in order to become more marketable post-grad.
I'm betting that french will bring your average up. You can do really well in french classes and though you can do well in history nd english, don't expect a mark over 85. Getting above a B+ in any English class is pretty impressve. In any case, it's not as bad as you might think.
2. Even though I've taken French through high school, could I still take a lower level French class in uni?
Yes. They will sort you into something (there are students who took french through all of high school who are in an intermediate class. You can ask to be put in a lower class or if it's too hard you can switch to another class in September.
3. What were some of the best English and History courses you took first-year?
Mine was Studies in the Novel. (not running next year) You can only take one English class first year anyway. Try and get in Hopkin's class. Studies in Canadian History and American History are pretty good too.
4. Were the Philosophy, Psychology, Linguistics, German, Canadian Studies ones great and/or interesting?
I'd suggest taking Modes of Reasoning: Thinking and Writing. It's a class you can get an A in and it takes care of your Modes of Reasoning requirement. Intro to Psych was dead boring in my opinion but many people liked it.
5. I have a friend who will attend Keele. If I want to visit her, is it a nuisance to get to the main campus?
Easy. There's a frequent free shuttlebus.
6. Also, what percentage of classes are on the main campus?
Err.. 99% maybe? You can do your entire degree at Glendon and never go there though.
7. If anyone's doing a concurrent teaching degree, do you have to do your practicums/blocks in the Toronto area?
8. Would it be difficult for me to do a double major and a concurrent teaching degree? Would there be a lot of choice in courses?
9. Which is a better residence - Wood or Hilliard? I'm thinking the former, but you tell me!
Hilliard. Wood seems dead.
10. How quickly does the food at Glendon get boring? Do you often venture up to Keele to eat?
Not worth going to Keele for food. There are about ten coffee shops within a fifteen minute walk from Glendon and the food here really isn't that bad.
11. If anyone lives in the Oakville/Burlington/Hamilton area, do you find it difficult or time-consuming to visit home on weekends?
12. How easy is it to get a job at Glendon? I need to make money!
Easy if you speak french. Otherwise.. not easy.